Arts and Entertainment 293 results

Fake It Till You Make It: Episode Two Sure Wants to Say Something

by Breanna Beers “You don’t have a rocket problem. You have a people problem.” “The papers like these guys. And people read the papers.” “People will want to know how this story ends. And people vote.” And what’s gonna make all our problems go away? What do votes mean, Bob?” “Money.” The second episode of Disney+ and National Geographic’s “The Right Stuff” begins to deliver on the trailer’s promise of addressing celebrity, but stilted writing combines with ...

The Builders of the Modern Blockbuster

by Ben Hiett The term “blockbuster” originally referred to WWII aerial bombs capable of taking out entire city blocks. However, by the 1980’s, the word had come to be associated with the larger-than-life adventure, explosive excitement and widespread popularity of movies like “Jaws,” “Star Wars,” and the like. In more recent years, we’ve seen this trend continue, with blockbusters becoming an established pillar of the film industry. I set out to determine which directors have ...

Reasonably Good Stuff: Disney+ Original Space Drama Launches Unremarkably

by Breanna Beers National Geographic’s eight-episode Disney+ original series “The Right Stuff” launched exactly as a rocket should: successfully, but uneventfully. The first episode outlines the selection of the ‘Mercury Seven,’ with a focus on three: John Glenn (Patrick J. Adams), Alan Shepard (Jake McDorman), and Gordon Cooper (Colin O'Donoghue). The early part of the episode focuses on the first two, foreshadowing a rivalry that we can expect to develop over the next seven ...

“Enola Holmes” Review: “Stranger Things” Star Shines as Sherlock’s Little Sister

by Hunter Johnson Over the last century, nearly a hundred actors have portrayed Sherlock Holmes in film and television. Whether it be the classic Basil Rathbone films from the 40s or Vasily Livanov’s well-received series from the 80s, Sherlock has long been an international staple of mystery storytelling. In recent years, the Sherlock mythos has entered a new phase that I like to call the “superhero phase.” He’s been played by Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.), Doctor Strange (Benedict ...

“Mulan” Review: Visually Stunning Remake Aims to be a Modern Myth, with Mixed Results

by Ben Hiett The first thing I did after seeing Disney’s live-action remake of “Mulan” was go to the source of all useful knowledge, Wikipedia, and look up the Chinese folk ballad on which both this movie and its animated counterpart are based.  I did this because the whole time I was watching this movie, I felt as though I was watching an ancient legend unfold before my eyes. With its sweeping scope, picturesque visuals, and archetypal characters, “Mulan” seeks to tell an ...

Tenet Review: Time Goes Backwards in Christopher Nolan’s Latest Epic

by Hunter Johnson Again and again, Christopher Nolan has proven his singular ability to tell completely original stories, and his latest cinematic endeavor is no exception. “Tenet” is an espionage thriller that redefines the genre by bringing the concept of time to its forefront.  Nolan’s use of time has repeatedly pushed the boundaries of both storytelling and filmmaking. His first big-budget film, “Memento,” shocked audiences by telling its story in reverse. His later films ...

An Oddball Cast Brings Life to a Timeless Tale: “The Personal History of David Copperfield” Review

by Hunter Johnson There is no way to truly prepare for the unabashed strangeness of Armando Iannucci’s brand-new adaptation of Charles Dickens’ classic semi-autobiographical novel. Indeed, “The Personal History of David Copperfield,” Iannucci’s third outing as a film director/writer, is a wild ride filled with sharp modern humor intertwined with classic Dickens material, creating an experience unlike any other. Iannucci is well-known for his dry humor and sharp wit – his ...

Student Spotlight: Shelby Ahlborg Seeks to Impact Film and TV Industry for Christ

by Katie Milligan Throughout her Cedarville career, graphic design major Shelby Ahlborg has found her niche within the artistic community and aspires to work in the film and television industry. Ahlborg, a fifth-year senior, transferred to Cedarville after one year in a public community college near her hometown in Illinois. After completing her first two years as a Theatre major, she switched to Graphic Design with a minor in Motion Graphics. She values the faith-based community that ...

Movie Review: ‘Parasite’

by Hunter Johnson Director Bong Joon-ho has displayed social issues in many films. In “Okja,” he asked some difficult questions in regard to animal cruelty. Before that there was the sci-fi action film “Snowpiercer” that addressed class conflict. Now he’s made another film about class conflict, but this time, his work has received four Academy Awards, including the highest honor of all: Best Picture. “Parasite” tells the story of a poor family and a rich family. The poor ...

Album Review: “American Standard” by James Taylor

By Joshua Stevens As artists grow older, many of them choose to focus their music and art on their own mortality. In the years past their prime, they shift from lighthearted lyrics to more serious tales of death and regret. Except, singer-songwriter James Taylor doesn’t do that. On his newest album, “American Standard,” Taylor focuses mostly on more positive material, and the album both prospers and suffers as a result. This album is loaded with cheerful, sunny lyrics and traditional ...